I am 100% addicted to social media. I check my Instagram account at least 8 times per day. Twitter maybe 5 and email… let's not go there. While this addiction is easy to offer a friendly chuckle of understanding, it's also a not-so-friendly wedge between families, spouses, and friends.

There is nothing more disrespectful than someone who is so busy checking their phone, they forget about those right in front of them. It's the equivalent of them saying, “You're not as valuable as these other people.”

I stumbled across this incredible Coca Cola commercial communicating this dilemma with a beautiful balance of emotion, class, and humor. Everyone should watch this. Prepare to smile.

Are you addicted to social media? Why do you think you struggle with it? Let me know in the comments below.

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54 thoughts on “Finally! A Legit Way To Keep People Off Their Phones

  1. White Tiger says:

    ADDICTED is an understatement… but I am also a massive hypocrite – will be on my phone, and hate when other people are on theirs… NOTHING IS THAT URGENT to be “talking” with people over your phone rather than TALKING to the person in front of you

  2. White Tiger says:

    ADDICTED is an understatement… but I am also a massive hypocrite – will be on my phone, and hate when other people are on theirs… NOTHING IS THAT URGENT to be “talking” with people over your phone rather than TALKING to the person in front of you

  3. Amanda says:

    Check out the UNICEF Tap Project – for the time that you don’t touch your phone, they donate clean water to those in need. It is very cool!

  4. Amanda says:

    Check out the UNICEF Tap Project – for the time that you don’t touch your phone, they donate clean water to those in need. It is very cool!

  5. Josie says:

    This is a huge problem within my relationship. I don’t have a facebook or a twitter and this is a big reason why. But my boyfriend is constantly on his phone. We have a long distance relationship and when I drive the 3 hours to see him, he always has his phone in hand while I’m trying to connect and be present with him. It’s hurtful to me because it makes me feel as though my time and effort in seeing him are unimportant. I’ve talked to him about it before, but he doesn’t seem to think that he has a problem. He has no idea about the way that it effects us. Just yesterday I was speaking to him on the phone, I paused for a response and finally after about 6-7 seconds I asked “hello?”. He said that he was sorry he got distracted because he was reading an interesting article WHILE HE WAS TALKING TO ME. I’m sort of at a loss. I don’t know what to do. I sent him a link to the previous article about cell phones and being present (which I found to be very prophetic), but it didn’t seem to hold much weight. Help?

    • reba says:

      You sound like you’ve tried to reach him, but he’s not receptive. In that case, I say get out! Find someone who values you! It will only get worse if you stay with him.

    • Dale Partridge says:

      I agree with Reba! You teach people how to treat you — Someone once told me that and I never forgot it!

  6. Josie says:

    This is a huge problem within my relationship. I don’t have a facebook or a twitter and this is a big reason why. But my boyfriend is constantly on his phone. We have a long distance relationship and when I drive the 3 hours to see him, he always has his phone in hand while I’m trying to connect and be present with him. It’s hurtful to me because it makes me feel as though my time and effort in seeing him are unimportant. I’ve talked to him about it before, but he doesn’t seem to think that he has a problem. He has no idea about the way that it effects us. Just yesterday I was speaking to him on the phone, I paused for a response and finally after about 6-7 seconds I asked “hello?”. He said that he was sorry he got distracted because he was reading an interesting article WHILE HE WAS TALKING TO ME. I’m sort of at a loss. I don’t know what to do. I sent him a link to the previous article about cell phones and being present (which I found to be very prophetic), but it didn’t seem to hold much weight. Help?

    • reba says:

      You sound like you’ve tried to reach him, but he’s not receptive. In that case, I say get out! Find someone who values you! It will only get worse if you stay with him.

    • Dale Partridge says:

      I agree with Reba! You teach people how to treat you — Someone once told me that and I never forgot it!

  7. Angel Andrew says:

    Hahahaha! Way to go Coca-Cola! Isn’t amazing what we discover, really discover, when we just look up?!

  8. Angel Andrew says:

    Hahahaha! Way to go Coca-Cola! Isn’t amazing what we discover, really discover, when we just look up?!

  9. Nancy says:

    I took a forty day fast from facebook, pinterest and t.v. and it was life changing…and life-giving. After the fast was over, I found myself on the slippery slope of facebook addiction again. It didn’t take long. And it made me feel icky. I end up thinking that my life isn’t as interesting as the “friend” who is constantly traveling, going out to cool restaurants, having hip parties, etc… And then I start getting irritated with people’s narcissism (including my own) by posting a lot of cutesy, useless information. Social media can be good for many reasons, but for me, I began to see that it was interfering with me living the adventurous life that God has intended me to live…and it was preventing me from seeing the important people right in front of me. So….I have completely given it up. Deactivated my account, and I don’t miss it a bit!!! But as you can see, I’m still on pinterest and I click onto positive articles like this one. I am constantly on guard though now and trying to limit my online time. I miss the good old fashioned days of living real life in front of me and having the mystery of what everyone else is doing. I think I need a social media guard…and a coca-cola! It’s all just a little too much for me. Thanks for your positive check points Dale. On another note…. I wonder if there are 12 step programs yet for people with this addiction? : ) It could be useful!

  10. Nancy says:

    I took a forty day fast from facebook, pinterest and t.v. and it was life changing…and life-giving. After the fast was over, I found myself on the slippery slope of facebook addiction again. It didn’t take long. And it made me feel icky. I end up thinking that my life isn’t as interesting as the “friend” who is constantly traveling, going out to cool restaurants, having hip parties, etc… And then I start getting irritated with people’s narcissism (including my own) by posting a lot of cutesy, useless information. Social media can be good for many reasons, but for me, I began to see that it was interfering with me living the adventurous life that God has intended me to live…and it was preventing me from seeing the important people right in front of me. So….I have completely given it up. Deactivated my account, and I don’t miss it a bit!!! But as you can see, I’m still on pinterest and I click onto positive articles like this one. I am constantly on guard though now and trying to limit my online time. I miss the good old fashioned days of living real life in front of me and having the mystery of what everyone else is doing. I think I need a social media guard…and a coca-cola! It’s all just a little too much for me. Thanks for your positive check points Dale. On another note…. I wonder if there are 12 step programs yet for people with this addiction? : ) It could be useful!

  11. Maurice Kande says:

    I wonder if the word ‘addicted’ would be appropriate. I work during the day and in the evening I spend a lot of times on my personal development blog and other social media platforms. I have a passion to motivate other people making progress and the internet just turns out to be a wonderful tool to achieve my ministry goal. It’s amazing the amount of influence I can spread in a few hours. If I use the internet that way, then I would call it a ‘passionate work’.
    I just can’t imagine having the same level of influence without the internet…

  12. Maurice Kande says:

    I wonder if the word ‘addicted’ would be appropriate. I work during the day and in the evening I spend a lot of times on my personal development blog and other social media platforms. I have a passion to motivate other people making progress and the internet just turns out to be a wonderful tool to achieve my ministry goal. It’s amazing the amount of influence I can spread in a few hours. If I use the internet that way, then I would call it a ‘passionate work’.
    I just can’t imagine having the same level of influence without the internet…

  13. Jillian says:

    This is so great! I always try to make my friends go into the “no phone zone” as I like to call it. We put our phones away for the night while we are together. Let’s just say they have a hard time sticking to it. No facebook and no twitter accounts for me. I use the computer for email, recipes and cute articles like this one. Trying to cut down even more!

  14. Jillian says:

    This is so great! I always try to make my friends go into the “no phone zone” as I like to call it. We put our phones away for the night while we are together. Let’s just say they have a hard time sticking to it. No facebook and no twitter accounts for me. I use the computer for email, recipes and cute articles like this one. Trying to cut down even more!

  15. Tess says:

    Social media allows people to create an image of the life they want as opposed to the life they have. Example: sharing pictures that make us look fashionably perfect, the house spotless, and the children angels; sharing news that is celebratory or the argument that makes us look taken advantage of and invokes sympathy. As a result, we can get caught up with the comments, likes, favorites and retweets. Living in the real world may be harder, but it’s more rewarding, relevant and effective. Anything less is like acting out a novel. Entertaining, perhaps. But with the potential to be damaging if it takes away from reality.

  16. Tess says:

    Social media allows people to create an image of the life they want as opposed to the life they have. Example: sharing pictures that make us look fashionably perfect, the house spotless, and the children angels; sharing news that is celebratory or the argument that makes us look taken advantage of and invokes sympathy. As a result, we can get caught up with the comments, likes, favorites and retweets. Living in the real world may be harder, but it’s more rewarding, relevant and effective. Anything less is like acting out a novel. Entertaining, perhaps. But with the potential to be damaging if it takes away from reality.

  17. Maylynn says:

    I’m getting married in a week and we are trying to figure out how to tell guests politely that no phones are allowed, and no details of our wedding should be posted on social media. My fiancΓ© and I are both NOT on FB or Instagram so we don’t want random pictures of us showing up on FB or Instagram. How donee politely tell everyone ahead of time to being their real cameras, since we want no phones allowed. We want everyone to be in the moment with us.

    • Just67 says:

      We are in a similar situation, however we both have a facebook account. I am including an information sheet with the invitation, which covers directions, nearby hotels etc. And this is where we are going to state clearly that we do not permit photos of ourselves or our immediate family to be placed on any social media site. I have no problem with people posting pictures of themselves. I have spoken with the registrar who is happy to announce after my arrival the banning of photography throughout the ceremony too. Totally agree with you, we want everyone in the moment with us too. Good Luck with it all : )

    • Ang says:

      An all out ban on phones could be tricky since some may have babysitters or whatever that could need to be reached, but I think it’s possible to firmly yet kindly ask that no one take photos they intend to put on social media as you’d like to keep the occasion personal, private, and intimate.

    • Alan B Rhyhill says:

      I will always fully support decisions like this… but we must also remember cellphones are… at times foremost safety devices. After I was, randomly severely beaten, my brother and sister received cellphones… why? So they could always call for help… due to family experience. We learn from our mistakes. [whether that be from a bush or an ambulance, and when you have a cell, EMR won’t call for you. ]

      Sometimes its the baby sitter calling about the little one… who’s screaming violently… ya know what… it could probably wait… but I have the patience for the odd person with an emergency even in theater… can we just be honest about it . If you don’t have kids and can get away with it [or employees on a dangerous well to care about]…. shut your phone off…

    • Christy says:

      I would say, “Please keep phones on silent and do not use, even for pictures, except in emergency situations.” Like others mentioned, there is the sitter dillema. Also, I have friends that are doctors, firefighters, even a pharmacist friend who are on call. They might like to enjoy the wedding if possible and if they cannot bring their phones, they cannot come. Then they will miss the wedding, when they might not even be called in. When I am in places without my kids, I often have it on vibrate and will look at it briefly if I receive a call, but will not answer unless it is the school or sitter.

  18. Maylynn says:

    I’m getting married in a week and we are trying to figure out how to tell guests politely that no phones are allowed, and no details of our wedding should be posted on social media. My fiancΓ© and I are both NOT on FB or Instagram so we don’t want random pictures of us showing up on FB or Instagram. How donee politely tell everyone ahead of time to being their real cameras, since we want no phones allowed. We want everyone to be in the moment with us.

    • Just67 says:

      We are in a similar situation, however we both have a facebook account. I am including an information sheet with the invitation, which covers directions, nearby hotels etc. And this is where we are going to state clearly that we do not permit photos of ourselves or our immediate family to be placed on any social media site. I have no problem with people posting pictures of themselves. I have spoken with the registrar who is happy to announce after my arrival the banning of photography throughout the ceremony too. Totally agree with you, we want everyone in the moment with us too. Good Luck with it all : )

    • Ang says:

      An all out ban on phones could be tricky since some may have babysitters or whatever that could need to be reached, but I think it’s possible to firmly yet kindly ask that no one take photos they intend to put on social media as you’d like to keep the occasion personal, private, and intimate.

    • Alan B Rhyhill says:

      I will always fully support decisions like this… but we must also remember cellphones are… at times foremost safety devices. After I was, randomly severely beaten, my brother and sister received cellphones… why? So they could always call for help… due to family experience. We learn from our mistakes. [whether that be from a bush or an ambulance, and when you have a cell, EMR won’t call for you. ]

      Sometimes its the baby sitter calling about the little one… who’s screaming violently… ya know what… it could probably wait… but I have the patience for the odd person with an emergency even in theater… can we just be honest about it . If you don’t have kids and can get away with it [or employees on a dangerous well to care about]…. shut your phone off…

    • Christy says:

      I would say, “Please keep phones on silent and do not use, even for pictures, except in emergency situations.” Like others mentioned, there is the sitter dillema. Also, I have friends that are doctors, firefighters, even a pharmacist friend who are on call. They might like to enjoy the wedding if possible and if they cannot bring their phones, they cannot come. Then they will miss the wedding, when they might not even be called in. When I am in places without my kids, I often have it on vibrate and will look at it briefly if I receive a call, but will not answer unless it is the school or sitter.

  19. HealingfromGod says:

    When I first read the title I thought of the new AT&T commercial with the family that all says, “Yep,” and how they say that this new phone plan will bring their family closer together…I really don’t think so lol.

  20. HealingfromGod says:

    When I first read the title I thought of the new AT&T commercial with the family that all says, “Yep,” and how they say that this new phone plan will bring their family closer together…I really don’t think so lol.

  21. Ariel Renae says:

    Internet wasn’t in my budget when I moved to attend college nor did I have a smart phone for the first year. Having online access only at school basically forced me out of my social media addiction. At the time it was frustrating, looking back now, I realize what a blessing it was.

  22. Ariel Renae says:

    Internet wasn’t in my budget when I moved to attend college nor did I have a smart phone for the first year. Having online access only at school basically forced me out of my social media addiction. At the time it was frustrating, looking back now, I realize what a blessing it was.

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