I believe animals have incredible intrinsic value. While much of society looks at them as only food, I look at them as creatures with physical feeling, instinctive fear and comfort, and most importantly a part of the earth.

As I said in my title. I love bacon (typically turkey bacon), but the manner in which animals are treated today makes me sick. It has forced my wife and I to only purchase organic, grass-fed, or cage free products.

The video below struck me as I watched humans experience what farm factory pigs do each day. By the end of this clip your view on what you eat might change.

How do we end this? Look for the labels “USDA Organic” or “Grass Fed” or “Cage-Free” on your products. Do not fall for unregulated terms like “All Natural” which do not speak to how the animal was fed, raised, or slaughtered. Let's end this inhumane era of animal treatment. Are you with me?

How did this video make you feel? Let me know in the comments below.


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26 thoughts on “I Love Bacon, But No Pig Should Be Treated Like This

  1. Matt Kathol says:

    Love the blog! I do have to add that the only 1% of”organic/free range/grass feed” is absolutely impossible to implement when it comes to a global population. It costs an extreme amount comparatively, we don’t have the land for it. On top of those things completely impossible to produce the demanded amount when all of these practices take nearly 3 times longer. Final though l thought, free range means that they only need to be out if a cage for ten seconds. Do not get me wrong I completely understand treatment and the benefits but it is not possible.

  2. Matt Kathol says:

    Love the blog! I do have to add that the only 1% of”organic/free range/grass feed” is absolutely impossible to implement when it comes to a global population. It costs an extreme amount comparatively, we don’t have the land for it. On top of those things completely impossible to produce the demanded amount when all of these practices take nearly 3 times longer. Final though l thought, free range means that they only need to be out if a cage for ten seconds. Do not get me wrong I completely understand treatment and the benefits but it is not possible.

  3. Rhonda Merrick says:

    I’m a vegetarian. It’s possible to eat a wide range of amazingly good food without meat. The dairy industry is cruel as well, but I found it impossible to give up milk and butter, so I understand what you’re saying.

  4. Rhonda Merrick says:

    I’m a vegetarian. It’s possible to eat a wide range of amazingly good food without meat. The dairy industry is cruel as well, but I found it impossible to give up milk and butter, so I understand what you’re saying.

  5. Ariel says:

    I’ve already switched a lot of my diet to cage free and organic foods in the last year or so…anyways, thanks for helping bring awareness to this Dale. Food industry or no, animal cruelty breaks my heart and needs to be resolved!

    On a separate note, seeing this makes me think that these gestation cages, coupled with other poor practices, is why pigs are dying from that virus I’ve been reading about in the news, which in turn is causing inflation in meat prices.

  6. Ariel says:

    I’ve already switched a lot of my diet to cage free and organic foods in the last year or so…anyways, thanks for helping bring awareness to this Dale. Food industry or no, animal cruelty breaks my heart and needs to be resolved!

    On a separate note, seeing this makes me think that these gestation cages, coupled with other poor practices, is why pigs are dying from that virus I’ve been reading about in the news, which in turn is causing inflation in meat prices.

  7. Leon says:

    I’ve geared my diet away from meat. I never eat pork, I wasn’t raised on it, it doesn’t taste good to me. I raised pigs as a kid and loved them. I can’t look at that animal and go “yay food!” More like horray and hello friend.

      • Leon says:

        they’re so intelligent and can be a little feisty but they’re really loving. People are like “they’re stupid, mean animals! better off dead!” not true at all = sure they’re farm animals but even farm animals can love their owners. I was completely devastated as a child however because the story has a very sad ending. The pigs were slaughtered and eaten for thanksgiving, which I had no say or part in. I refuse to eat pig ever. Those were my bros. 🙁

  8. Leon says:

    I’ve geared my diet away from meat. I never eat pork, I wasn’t raised on it, it doesn’t taste good to me. I raised pigs as a kid and loved them. I can’t look at that animal and go “yay food!” More like horray and hello friend.

  9. Emily Anderson says:

    How do we end this? Go vegetarian/vegan! It’s the only way to truly end this kind of treatment toward animals. The labels that you mentioned are a step in the right direction,but if you truly care about animals,you should consider avoiding animal products altogether.

    Thank you for this post though! It is encouraging for me as a vegan, animal lover see you acknowledge positive world change for animals,too! 🙂

  10. Emily Anderson says:

    How do we end this? Go vegetarian/vegan! It’s the only way to truly end this kind of treatment toward animals. The labels that you mentioned are a step in the right direction,but if you truly care about animals,you should consider avoiding animal products altogether.

    Thank you for this post though! It is encouraging for me as a vegan, animal lover see you acknowledge positive world change for animals,too! 🙂

  11. Laura says:

    As a rancher’s daughter, I know most farmers and ranchers
    raise their animals with their welfare put far ahead of anything else. Yes,
    including money. While my expertise remains in the cattle industry, I have
    friends that work in pork production. These are the people I go to for answers,
    not activist groups. The thought of a gestation crate makes me uncomfortable,
    but without them the mother pigs would accidentally kill their young by laying
    on them and in some cases intentionally kill them (some will eat their babies).
    Free range systems also make it harder for some of the pigs to get to food and
    water since they have to “compete” with other animals. Also grass-fed does not
    insure an animal has been raised on pasture. It simply means they have received
    a forage based diet through harvest. I noticed the video was from HSUS, please
    do not make your decisions based on information received from this group. Their
    personal agenda has out-shined any actual humane work being done. As a
    journalist, I’ve found the only sources of information to trust have always
    been directly from the source. Reach out to a farmer of a “factory farm” and
    discuss your concerns with you. They will talk to you and may even give you a
    tour. To find one in your area, I suggest contacting the National Pork Board
    info@pork.org and they can assist you in finding a producer to speak with. And
    if you have any questions, please email me on my personal account at mush_laura@hotmail.com. I’d love to continue this conversation with you.

    • Dale Partridge says:

      I really appreciate that you’ve done your research, and I would definitely encourage everyone else to do the same. Thank you so much for sharing Laura!

  12. Laura says:

    As a rancher’s daughter, I know most farmers and ranchers
    raise their animals with their welfare put far ahead of anything else. Yes,
    including money. While my expertise remains in the cattle industry, I have
    friends that work in pork production. These are the people I go to for answers,
    not activist groups. The thought of a gestation crate makes me uncomfortable,
    but without them the mother pigs would accidentally kill their young by laying
    on them and in some cases intentionally kill them (some will eat their babies).
    Free range systems also make it harder for some of the pigs to get to food and
    water since they have to “compete” with other animals. Also grass-fed does not
    insure an animal has been raised on pasture. It simply means they have received
    a forage based diet through harvest. I noticed the video was from HSUS, please
    do not make your decisions based on information received from this group. Their
    personal agenda has out-shined any actual humane work being done. As a
    journalist, I’ve found the only sources of information to trust have always
    been directly from the source. Reach out to a farmer of a “factory farm” and
    discuss your concerns with you. They will talk to you and may even give you a
    tour. To find one in your area, I suggest contacting the National Pork Board
    info@pork.org and they can assist you in finding a producer to speak with. And
    if you have any questions, please email me on my personal account at mush_laura@hotmail.com. I’d love to continue this conversation with you.

  13. vet student says:

    Dale,

    I was raised on a hog farm and have worked with pigs since I was
    12. I’m currently in veterinary school.

    Gestation crates are used to prevent aggression between sows.
    When sows are not in crates but are kept in group housing, they often fight one
    another in an attempt to establish a social hierarchy within a pen. Also, some
    pens are established with “crates” in them. When given the choice,
    95% of the sows will spend the majority of their time in the crate, not the
    pen. They go into the crate to escape confrontation with aggressive sows. Also,
    individual or “crate” housing allows farm staff to monitor each sows
    well being. When a sow isn’t eating (often because they are sick) individual
    housing allows farmers to quickly recognize the issue and treat the animal with
    the drugs it needs. This is not the case in group housing. Individual housing
    also allows farmers to adjust the amount of feed the sow is getting. Sows that
    are too skinny or too fat have difficulty conceiving and birthing, so it is
    important that each sows body condition be properly maintained. From an outside
    perspective crates may look bad, I get it. I understand animal welfare and will
    take an oath to defend the well being off animals. However, given my experience
    with sow housing and understanding of swine medicine I believe individual or
    “crate” housing is the best option for the well being of sows.

    Generally speaking, an “organically” raised animal
    never receives antibiotics in its lifespan. This label does not mean that its
    mother did not live in a gestation crate. With regard to an animal’s well being
    I do not believe organic is the answer. On an organic farm, when an animal gets
    sick, it is suppose to receive antibiotics and then be marketed separate from
    the rest of its herd mates. The problem is that some of these organic farms do
    not have a market to take their non-organic (pigs that have received treatment)
    animals to, so they simply never treat pigs when they get sick on their farm.
    Because organic pigs are worth more money, it is in the farmer’s best interest
    to not treat the animal or to delay treatment a day or two and see if it
    recovers without treatment.

    I’m not sure if there is a “grass fed” label for pork
    products. But it is worth noting that raising pigs outdoors exposes them to the
    elements (cold, rain, snow, heat). It also exposes them to a host of parasites
    that are present in the soil. For the most part parasites are a non-issue in
    pigs housed indoors.

    My opinion is that conventional or what you may call
    “factory farming” is the most humane method to raise pigs. It
    is also the most efficient way to raise the pigs. In 2050 the world population
    is expected to reach 9 billion. This is a real problem. I will spend my career
    trying to solve it. Frankly speaking, raising anything organically is
    inefficient use of limited resources. I respect your opinion and enjoy reading
    your stuff, but I think you got this one wrong Dale.

  14. vet student says:

    Dale,

    I was raised on a hog farm and have worked with pigs since I was
    12. I’m currently in veterinary school.

    Gestation crates are used to prevent aggression between sows.
    When sows are not in crates but are kept in group housing, they often fight one
    another in an attempt to establish a social hierarchy within a pen. Also, some
    pens are established with “crates” in them. When given the choice,
    95% of the sows will spend the majority of their time in the crate, not the
    pen. They go into the crate to escape confrontation with aggressive sows. Also,
    individual or “crate” housing allows farm staff to monitor each sows
    well being. When a sow isn’t eating (often because they are sick) individual
    housing allows farmers to quickly recognize the issue and treat the animal with
    the drugs it needs. This is not the case in group housing. Individual housing
    also allows farmers to adjust the amount of feed the sow is getting. Sows that
    are too skinny or too fat have difficulty conceiving and birthing, so it is
    important that each sows body condition be properly maintained. From an outside
    perspective crates may look bad, I get it. I understand animal welfare and will
    take an oath to defend the well being off animals. However, given my experience
    with sow housing and understanding of swine medicine I believe individual or
    “crate” housing is the best option for the well being of sows.

    Generally speaking, an “organically” raised animal
    never receives antibiotics in its lifespan. This label does not mean that its
    mother did not live in a gestation crate. With regard to an animal’s well being
    I do not believe organic is the answer. On an organic farm, when an animal gets
    sick, it is suppose to receive antibiotics and then be marketed separate from
    the rest of its herd mates. The problem is that some of these organic farms do
    not have a market to take their non-organic (pigs that have received treatment)
    animals to, so they simply never treat pigs when they get sick on their farm.
    Because organic pigs are worth more money, it is in the farmer’s best interest
    to not treat the animal or to delay treatment a day or two and see if it
    recovers without treatment.

    I’m not sure if there is a “grass fed” label for pork
    products. But it is worth noting that raising pigs outdoors exposes them to the
    elements (cold, rain, snow, heat). It also exposes them to a host of parasites
    that are present in the soil. For the most part parasites are a non-issue in
    pigs housed indoors.

    My opinion is that conventional or what you may call
    “factory farming” is the most humane method to raise pigs. It
    is also the most efficient way to raise the pigs. In 2050 the world population
    is expected to reach 9 billion. This is a real problem. I will spend my career
    trying to solve it. Frankly speaking, raising anything organically is
    inefficient use of limited resources. I respect your opinion and enjoy reading
    your stuff, but I think you got this one wrong Dale.

    • Non-techie Talk says:

      The resources consumed to produce 1lb of food from animal sources far outweigh the net nutrition from animals as food vs. from fruit and vegetable sources. Conversations about feeding 9 billion people tends to talk more about population growth control rather than changing our diet; but fruit and vegetable diet is far more effiicient use of land, water, etc. Just sayin’.

      • vet student says:

        That is true and cannot be argued. My point is that regulating animal ag in a manner that reduces effeciency and does not improve animal welfare is a step backwards, ie banning gestation crates.

        Our species evolved eating meat. One study finds “children whose diets were supplemented with meat or milk showed improved growth, motor development, levels of physical activity, leadership skills and initiative and test scores”. Stunting effeciency of animal product production does hurt the affluent, it makes these nutrients less affordable to lower income households. And for what?

  15. vet student says:

    Also the picture of pigs enclosed in the cages is completely misleading, that is not what a gestation crate looks like.

  16. vet student says:

    Also the picture of pigs enclosed in the cages is completely misleading, that is not what a gestation crate looks like.

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