How To Make An Insanely Powerful Business Card

Dale Partridge
25
718

I've had 21 different business cards over the past 11 years. Some for businesses I owned, some for those I co-owned, and even some for those I never launched.

A business card is an important step for any entrepreneur. It's often the first hard evidence of your dream. But more importantly it's a first impression of who you are and what you represent. But making a powerful business card is not easy…

Here are a few personal secrets I have learned over the years:

1. It Can't Be Worth Throwing Away: If your card looks just like everyone else's card, you failed. It should look different, feel different, and have a little bit of crazy. For example, if you own a butcher shop, your card should be printed on beef jerky. If you're a realtor, you card should be printed on a quarter inch piece of curly grain maple with the contact information burned into the wood. My point is this…

Be so good they can't ignore you.

It shouldn't fit in a wallet because it's not supposed to. You want that thing sitting on their desk for a year. The people who receive your card should be so impressed with the creative crazy behind it, that they show ten of their friends.

2. Design Is WAY More Important Than You Think: The quality of your business card design is a direct reflection of the quality of your product or service. If your card is boring, you're boring. If your card is hard to read, you don't understand communication. Every detail from the fonts and the colors to the spacing between letters and the placement of your logo are incredibly important.

I found this awesome infographic (below) explaining the details and “how to's” on crafting a well designed business card. Enjoy.

ThePsychologyofBusinessCards

What's the craziest business card you've ever seen? Let me know about it in the comments below.

25 COMMENTS

  1. The wood shop near me has business cards printed on thin maple, just like you suggested. Texturally cool!

  2. Packet of seeds with my details as well as sowing instructions at the back for my gift shop. After 6 years still gets calls for some products!

  3. If you’re new in business you put a premium on things anyone can do (like business cards) if you’re young and new in business like whoever wrote this, you probably rely on these types of tactics because you like seeing your title printed out or your portfolio or even your capability isn’t impressive enough on its own.
    If you want to make a big impression, be prepared and informed, confident and responsible. If you’re those things, you can write your contact information on a napkin and they’ll keep it.

    • Agreed… you can’t have a business card without also being prepared, informed, confident and responsible. However, you absolutely need both. We who are “new in business” are experiencing that our expensive degrees, high GPA’s, endless extracurriculars and years of work experience have depreciated in value ten-fold since you were applying for jobs due to the immense surplus of labor and workforce saturation.
      A unique and well thought business card is an interesting, innovative and memorable way to advance your resume to the top of the stack that’s sitting on this employers desk.

  4. I have met many contacts from Campbell’s Soup. Their business cards are a shaped like a can of soup with contact information on the back

  5. I took a class from a graphic designer who had wooden coin business cards with his details burned into them. I always think of him just due to that card.

    • People get paid to answer questions like these, Jamie. Find a good designer to who will learn about your audience and create something meaningful. Test a few ideas and go with the one that ultimately attracts your clients most – because remember, it’s their opinion that counts after all.
      -Merle
      @MrMerleFisher

  6. I’ve had a few different cards, 14pt and 16pt Card stock, shapes and now ibe got 32pt card stock … but again a good design and always having them on me is key.

  7. Lego employees have minifigures that look like them (name on front of figure, email on back of figure).

  8. I can’t agree more on this post. Here is what I do.

    My new cards are handcut from a heavy stock of paper, I then use a heavy ink and custom designed stamps to press the ink on the paper. I then spread embossing powder on the ink. (it sticks only to the ink), and bond the powder to the card with a small blow torch. With the blow torch I also make some burn marks on the card for effect.

    A little overboard? Yes, but I do experience design and the whole process of the story behind the cards creation is part of the “experience”.

    Company name of course is “Experiential Fuse”.

  9. OK, this post has given me new insights and understanding in my own business card. And I think, any entrepreneur would be able to benefit from the tips given by Dale. Thanks for this post, Dale! Cheers!

  10. I would have loved to see more information on how to actually display the information; so many cards these days look extremely sloppy and untidy, including “http://” and/or “www” before their URL, and that has a way of taking from the actual domain name. Others load it with all the information in the world—to the point that it’s so busy you can’t tell what is the point they want to get across.

  11. One of the best business cards i ever received was for a chocolate shop. I was handed a small drawstring bag with a single chocolate inside along with the business card.

  12. I’m looking for a specific design for my business card, it’s not just a flat card, but has dimension and folds into a specific shape which is perfect for my profession. Any ideas on who can design a card for a reasonable price? The last business wanted to charge me almost $1,000 for 500 cards, including the design and printing.

  13. Tracey Fergerson, email what you are looking for to me at my work email. Sales@nuimage.com and I will see what I can do to help you with your business cards if you are still looking for a supplier. Nancy, New Image 800-836-0523

  14. My grandfather had his business info printed on the back side of a half copy of a $20 bill. This was then folded in half. He would leave them laying around, even dropping them in parking lots, etc., and people would puck them up thinking hhat they found $20. When they opened up the “20”, his business info was there.. I always thought this was so clever..lol

Comments are closed.